British Holiday and Home Parks Association, David Bellamy Conservations Awards

British Holiday and Home Parks Association, David Bellamy Conservations Awards

Golf Courses and Farmland

Golf Courses and Farmland

Many parks are either part of a farm or have a golf course (or both). These offer enormous potential for the conservation, protection and enhancement of wildlife.

Farmland: There are many things that can be done to manage farmland in an environmentally friendly way. For example, borders, buffer zones and field corners can be planted with wildflowers and any hedge and tree cover enhanced and expanded. If you have such land to manage, think about taking part in (at least) DEFRA’s entry-level environmental stewardship scheme for farm management (see www.defra.gov.uk). You could also consider going organic or implementing ‘conservation grade’ farm management. LEAF (Linking Environment And Farming - www.leafuk.org) is one organisation that helps farmers improve their environmental performance. NB: Farmland is NOT formally as part of the David Bellamy scheme. However, if a park manages its farmland in an environmentally friendly way, then this will be taken as further evidence of the park’s commitment to environmental improvement.

Golf courses can also be managed with wildlife in mind. For example a variety of habitats included woods, heath, wildflower meadows, hedges, wetlands and ponds can be incorporated into a course. Fairways can be managed with low-impact chemical and watering regimes. NB: If golf courses are part of the ‘package’ offered to holidaymakers then they will be assessed alongside the rest of the park, with particular attention paid to habitat creation and chemical and water use.

More information:

  • For more information on green golf course management contact the Scottish Golf Environment Group (www.sgeg.org.uk).